Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Olav RueppellPrincipal Investigator:

 

  Dr. Olav Rueppell
  Associate Professor
  Department of Biology 
  University of North Carolina
  206 Eberhart Bldg.
  Greensboro, NC 27403
  phone (336) 256-2591
  fax (336) 334-5839
CV   email: olav_rueppell!at!uncg.edu

 
RESEARCH

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TEACHING
 
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  LAB MEMBERS
 

 
OUTREACH & LINKS
 
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HOW TO FIND US:

Our office and lab space are located in the Eberhart Building

on the main UNCG campus. Click for a broad or a detailed

map how to get there.

Our research apiary and bee facility are located

5min to the west (see map).

If you want to DONATE directly to UNCGs honey bee research program,
please contact me or the UNCG Development Office for details.

Disclaimer: The material located at this site is not endorsed, sponsored, or provided by

or on behalf of the University of North Carolina, nor am I responsible for the content and operation of, or any damage done by the links provided!

LAST UPDATED Sept. 2011

 

Honey Bee Health Related Research:

The honey bee, Apis mellifera (L), is our most important pollinator, vital to sustainable modern agriculture and ecosystem functioning. Over of agricultural crops are insect pollinated and the commercial value of honey bee pollination in the U.S. alone has been estimated to be approximately $15,000,000,000 annually. Honey bees are threatened by diseases, pesticides, and malnutrition and cultural trends contribute to the long-term decline of honey bee populations in the US. Over the last few years, dramatic losses of honey bees were reported in a new phenomenon, called Colony Collapse Disorder.

 

 

 

On the one hand, we are working to develop the intestinal stem cells as a relevant sensitive health indicator and potential screening tool for pathogen and pesticide related research. The midgut is particularly relevant because most pathogens and toxins are ingested and enter the bees through the intestinal epithelium.

Our second applied research focus (funded by USDA), targets the characterization of naturally-evolved Varroa mite resistance. Varroa ectoparasitic mites are a severe, global pathogen of Apis mellifera after its transfer from the native host Apis cerana. We are studying potential local host-pathogen co-evolution in this system in Thailand, we are trying to characterize the molecular interactions between bees and mites, and we are seeking to find molecular correlates of mite non-reproduction.

 

 

 

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